Therapeutic Strategies for the Treatment of Ocular Surface Disorders

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Course Information

Therapautic Area: Ophthalmology
Format(s): Webcast
Credit(s): N/A
Activity Dates: November 5, 2014 - November 4, 2015

 

This course is still available as a learning tool but has expired for CME credit.

Program Overview

Ocular surface disease (OSD) is very common disorder, which affects millions of Americans. OSD affects the cornea, conjunctiva, eye lids, meibomian glands, or pre-ocular tear film. The dysfunction of these components can result in damage to the ocular surface, which necessitates rapid recognition and intervention to prevent patients from suffering permanent damage. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is crucial to successfully managing OSD and emphasizes the need for educational interventions to reach the ultimate goal of improving patient care. This CME activity will bring clinicians up to date with guidelines, as well as the most effective techniques to integrate these guidelines when making individualized treatment plans for patients. Current clinical trial data of emerging and available therapies will be discussed to ensure efficient treatment is provided to patients. In addition, practical strategies to apply this knowledge in practice will be provided to ensure optimal care for every patient with OSD.

Target Audience

Ophthalmologists, and healthcare professionals responsible for the diagnosis, treatment, or management of patients with ocular surface disorder.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Review the differential diagnosis, signs and symptoms of OSD.
  2. Recognize the significance of inadequately managed OSD as it applies to ophthalmological surgical procedures.
  3. Evaluate current therapies for ocular surface disorders and dry eye.
  4. Develop individualized treatment plans that effectively treat OSD and prevent long-term ocular injury.

Registration



This activity has been supported by educational grants from Alcon Research, Ltd. and Bausch + Lomb Incorporated.

Co-provided by the Elsevier Office of Continuing Medical Education and AcademicCME EOCME-AcademicCME-Co-provided_061214